April 10, 2013 | Vol. 94, No. 84

Council agrees to borrow roughly $130,000 for road project

HURLEY — The Hurley City Council decided Tuesday to borrow approximately $130,000 to cover additional costs for its County D road extension project.

Cortney Ofstad/Daily Globe
The Hurley City Council talked about County D on Tuesday night.

According to Jeff Seamandel, MSA Professional Services project manager, the Wisconsin Department of Transportation is requiring the city to widen approximately 1,000 feet of south Wisconsin 77 at a future intersection with the proposed County D extension.

The city had already earmarked approximately $950,000 for the County D project.

Seamandel said additional costs due to the Wisconsin 77 work will include $72,985 for road design, $14,400 for land acquisition, $25,000 for real estate along the highway and $16,857 for a 15 percent contingency. The real estate figure is estimated, and the contingency is used as a cushion in case other fees were to arise.

All of the extra costs come to $129,242. The council decided it would borrow the extra costs from the tax increment financing.

It was also discussed about having MSA continue it’s work on an environmental assessment that needs to be completed and submitted to the WDOT prior to the County D utility construction project this year, otherwise the city loses its earmarked funds.

A motion was made and approved to have Seamandel draw up a contract for the council to look over during the next meeting to continue using services from MSA for the project.

Flower Project

Joy Schelble, Wisconsin Nutrition Program educator through the Iron County University of Wisconsin-Extension office, spoke to the council about the annual planting project in downtown Hurley.

Each year, third grade students from the Hurley K-12 School plant flowers in pots along Silver Street. This year, the event will take place on May 30, with a rain date of May 31.

The planting materials are donated by Giovanoni’s, so Schelble said that she only had to request $92 for materials.

According to council member Charlene Mussatti, there are funds in the budget for the project, so it’s already pre-approved.

Schelble thanked Public Works Director Mark Bluse for his help in keeping the plants watered each year.

“He is such a gift to have,” Schelble said.

The council was also updated on a coalition that Schelble is heading up with the Hurley School, local businesses and the UW-Extension office to create a “healthier Hurley.”

“We had an assessment done to see where certain areas needed to be addressed, including access to nutritional foods and physical activities,” Schelble said.

The Safe Walk to School program and non-motorized trails are being planned, as well as utilizing the Hurley School garden in the school’s lunch program, Iron County Food Pantry and revitalizing the Iron County Farmer’s Market.

“I just wanted to keep you updated on this, just to let you know how things were going,” Schelble said.

The council also discussed planting urban trees this year, after Schelble informed members that a grant has been received to plant trees across the city.

“I wanted to see where you wanted trees to go, and what trees you want to see planted,” Schelble said.

Mussatti said that trees could be planted in the two “green areas” downtown, which include the Iron Horse Trailhead on the corner of Silver Street and 5th Avenue, as well as on the corner of Silver Street and 2nd Avenue.

Mayor Joe Pinardi said he would meet with Schelble to discuss possible planting locations to present at the next council meeting in May.

“All of these projects are counting on the ground to show itself, and the snow to go away,” Schelble said. “Hopefully that will be soon.”

Other Business

—The council approved a motion from the finance committee to give the Hurley Fourth of July Committee $2,500 towards the fireworks display.

—A motion was also approved to allow Bill Hall, of the Iron Horse, to have live music outside his establishment during Memorial Day weekend. The council approved a variance on the city ordinance to allow the music to last until midnight on Friday and Saturday nights.