The Daily Globe - Serving Gogebic, Iron and Ontonagon Counties

Community participates in cleanup day in spite of rain

 

Steve Newman/Daily Globe

Students, FROM left, Nick Backlund, Sophia Halverson and Amelia Green assist in unloading contents of a trailer into a front end loader at the Ironwood city-wide cleanup day on Saturday. Volunteers from the Ironwood JROTC assisted Ironwood city staff at the twice-annual event.

By STEVE NEWMAN

newsroom@yourdailyglobe.com

Ironwood - In spite of a rainy day on Saturday, city staff worked with Ironwood's JROTC and other volunteers to offer their twice-yearly citywide cleanup day. Cars were parked well down Ayer Street in advance of the event, but due to the rain, turnout was down somewhat and the residents did not have to wait long to unload.

According to city manager Scott Erickson, the day is one of the most popular events the city offers for its residents. "Usually there is a morning rush at the start at 8 a.m. and a late rush toward the end of the time at 11 a.m," Erickson said. The event started about 14 years ago as part of the city's fight on blight, and gives city residents "a easy way to get rid of junk they accumulate," Ericksoln said. He added that the city has made a effort to be serious about getting rid of blight, with emphasis on enforcement of blight laws, and this event enables residents to do their own cleanup at no cost to them.

The cleanup day has become one of the most popular events the city offers, and is usually busy during the whole time with lines as far back as the high school. Erickson complement the work of the Ironwood JROTC to help unload vehicles, calling their work "phenomenal." He stated that they "do a great job and work hard," and the city is "lucky to have them participating." The JROTC has helped for a number of years, and Erickson stated that their participation "made the program continue" because the activity is volunteer-based. "Everyone out here is a volunteer, and this group makes it sustainable. We would have lost our volunteers a long time ago if we didn't have help from the JROTC," Erickson stated.

Since the program has been such a success, it has now been written into the contracts for garbage pickup with the various contractors. "We have it written in the contract that they will provide this service twice a year, spring and fall," said Erickson.

He is optimistic about the city's infrastructure. There is a continuing cumulative effect of events such as recent road repairs, removal of blighted houses and citizens being responsible for their own properties. "You may not be able to put your finger on any one thing, but there is a cumulative effect," said Erickson. Some other recent events that have been encouraging have been First Fridays, with the recent "Plaidurday" getting an excellent turn out. "People in town are having fun getting downtown again." He stated that local paving projects are getting done and Phase 4 of the water and sewer project is still going strong and that they could still use another month of good weather to try and finish that project.

Ironwood students Nick Backlund, Sophie Halverson and Amelia Green were among those assisting and were enjoying their time in spite of the rain. They stated that they were happy to make a contribution to their community.

According to JROTC Chief Warrant Officer Noah Hale, the JROTC has been involved for a number of years, and brought a crew of 25-30 young people who braved the elements to serve in unloading vehicles and loading the items into front end loaders to be put in dumpsters. The young people were soaked through from the rain but appeared to be having fun. He stated "The JROTC also is involved in many projects involving veteran recognition, citizenship, and volunteerism." The JROTC consists of young people in grades 9-12 at the school. The group will be volunteering at many of the upcoming Veterans Day celebrations in the area, doing color guards and assisting in veteran recognition and is involved in many parades, including the recent Pumpkinfest parade in Bessemer.

Their community projects include annual events such as the recent Special Olympics Area 39 bocce ball games, at which the Ironwood JROTC was recognized for 25 years of service, the upcoming library book sale next Saturday, the blood drive at the high school and other community events as requested. Hale has been working in the Ironwood area for the past year, following a tour of duty in South Korea and has been very pleased the JROTC group. The JROTC helps make smaller groups larger and can assist other groups where they could be a good representative. Groups that can use assistance can contact Hale or Col. Kiefer at 932-3230. By STEVE NEWMAN

newsroom@yourdailyglobe.com

Ironwood - In spite of a rainy day on Saturday, city staff worked with Ironwood's JROTC and other volunteers to offer their twice-yearly citywide cleanup day. Cars were parked well down Ayer Street in advance of the event, but due to the rain, turnout was down somewhat and the residents did not have to wait long to unload.

According to city manager Scott Erickson, the day is one of the most popular events the city offers for its residents. "Usually there is a morning rush at the start at 8 a.m. and a late rush toward the end of the time at 11 a.m," Erickson said. The event started about 14 years ago as part of the city's fight on blight, and gives city residents "a easy way to get rid of junk they accumulate," Ericksoln said. He added that the city has made a effort to be serious about getting rid of blight, with emphasis on enforcement of blight laws, and this event enables residents to do their own cleanup at no cost to them.

The cleanup day has become one of the most popular events the city offers, and is usually busy during the whole time with lines as far back as the high school. Erickson complement the work of the Ironwood JROTC to help unload vehicles, calling their work "phenomenal." He stated that they "do a great job and work hard," and the city is "lucky to have them participating." The JROTC has helped for a number of years, and Erickson stated that their participation "made the program continue" because the activity is volunteer-based. "Everyone out here is a volunteer, and this group makes it sustainable. We would have lost our volunteers a long time ago if we didn't have help from the JROTC," Erickson stated.

Since the program has been such a success, it has now been written into the contracts for garbage pickup with the various contractors. "We have it written in the contract that they will provide this service twice a year, spring and fall," said Erickson.

He is optimistic about the city's infrastructure. There is a continuing cumulative effect of events such as recent road repairs, removal of blighted houses and citizens being responsible for their own properties. "You may not be able to put your finger on any one thing, but there is a cumulative effect," said Erickson. Some other recent events that have been encouraging have been First Fridays, with the recent "Plaidurday" getting an excellent turn out. "People in town are having fun getting downtown again." He stated that local paving projects are getting done and Phase 4 of the water and sewer project is still going strong and that they could still use another month of good weather to try and finish that project.

Ironwood students Nick Backlund, Sophie Halverson and Amelia Green were among those assisting and were enjoying their time in spite of the rain. They stated that they were happy to make a contribution to their community.

According to JROTC Chief Warrant Officer Noah Hale, the JROTC has been involved for a number of years, and brought a crew of 25-30 young people who braved the elements to serve in unloading vehicles and loading the items into front end loaders to be put in dumpsters. The young people were soaked through from the rain but appeared to be having fun. He stated "The JROTC also is involved in many projects involving veteran recognition, citizenship, and volunteerism." The JROTC consists of young people in grades 9-12 at the school. The group will be volunteering at many of the upcoming Veterans Day celebrations in the area, doing color guards and assisting in veteran recognition and is involved in many parades, including the recent Pumpkinfest parade in Bessemer.

Their community projects include annual events such as the recent Special Olympics Area 39 bocce ball games, at which the Ironwood JROTC was recognized for 25 years of service, the upcoming library book sale next Saturday, the blood drive at the high school and other community events as requested. Hale has been working in the Ironwood area for the past year, following a tour of duty in South Korea and has been very pleased the JROTC group. The JROTC helps make smaller groups larger and can assist other groups where they could be a good representative. Groups that can use assistance can contact Hale or Col. Kiefer at 932-3230.

 
 

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